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Short-Term Efficacy of Proprioceptive Training On Balance In The Elderly

Mateja Antolin
Alma Mater Europaea - ECM
Slovenia

Tine Kovačič
Alma Mater Europaea - ECM
Slovenia

Uroš Marušič
Alma Mater Europaea - ECM
Slovenia

Introduction: In the biological process of aging, there are changes in the cognitive and physical system, which can be reflected in poorer balance, which increases the possibility of falls. Prevention, including a non-pharmacological approach in the form of proprioceptive training, makes sense to prevent falls. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of two months of proprioceptive training on the elderly without and with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Methods: The study involved 19 elderly people living in nursing homes (aged between 67 and 95, 13 women and 6 men) randomly divided into an intervention and control group. A two-month proprioceptive training in combination with the PNF concept was performed with the intervention team twice a week for 60 minutes. Functional status was verified by the four-square-foot step test and the SPPB (Short Physical Performance Battery) test. Results: All residents of the nursing home successfully completed a two-month proprioceptive exercise. The intervention resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the four-square test (p <0.05), no improvement was detected in the SPPB test (p> 0.05), and no difference was found in the effect of proprioceptive exercise in people with poor cognitive status (p> 0). , 05). Conclusion: Based on the results of the study, we found that proprioceptive training is a successful form of non-pharmacological intervention in nursing homes and has positive effects on balance, but in the future more intensive and longer-term intervention would make sense.

 

 


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